MORE GOOD MEMORIES

4 09 2011

Hi again:  when I was growing up which has of course been quite awhile ago, we did not have shampoos as such.  I guess there was something around because there were beauty shops but I don’t know what they used.  At our house, we used a bar of ivory soap and rubbed that in our hair and then scrubbed with our fingers until we were clean.  This was done in the kitchen sink.

Then we rinsed until we were sure all the ivory was gone.  After that, we rinsed our hair with a combination of vinegar and water.  Probably about 1/3 vinegar to a cup of water.  Then we rinsed more with water and we were through.  The vinegar worked like a combination  of conditioner and rinse.  Anyway, it worked beautifully.

To this day, I have used many a shampoo in my time and  some I liked and a lot I did not.  But in the last few years, I have gone back to the soap, using liquid dawn most of the time.  Then I scrub my head with my fingers just as I have always done.  Then I rinse with that same combination of vinegar and water.  Then I rinse again with plain water and I’m done.  Not expensive, not hard to do and my hair always turns out o.k.  Don’t have a lot of tangles and never have any oily or fine type problems.

When shampoos first became popular, it was advertised on the radio every Sunday night with the girl singing of the shampoo.  I am sure you have heard the jingle many times.  My grandmother who lived with us believed in all the commercials.  So she insisted my mother pick us up some of that new, wonderful shampoo.  But don’t think any of us liked it much.  My grandmother went to the beauty shop every week anyway, so didn’t matter to her.  When she went to the beauty shop, she usually came home with blue hair.  But we all told her how nice she looked so she was happy with blue hair.

I hated beauty shops because I only got to go there to get that terrible, awful permanent wave every year before school started.  The last one I got was so fuzzy that my date called me fuzzy bear when he picked me up to go to the movies.  After that, I was permanently through with fried permanent waves.  But then home permanents came out and that was a whole new story.

Meanwhile back at the shampoo story, earlier in the century, my husband’s grandmother lived in the country and she combed kerosene through her hair to make sure there were no bugs.  At that time, women washed their hair in soft rain water which was caught in a cistern.  Didn’t want to use that hard well water.  So, see, things really aren’t so bad after all in this world of today.  At least we don’t have to worry about having our hair catch on fire because we have just combed through it with kerosene.

If you like this sort of story, you will love my books.  #2503 (my address when I was growing up) tells of growing up in the 30’s & 40’s.   In The 1940’s is the name of the next one and tells all about those War years and living at that time and  The Wonderful 1950’s is all about that time.  Each book is $10 with no postage or order all three for $25.  Just send check or money order to BET   P.O. Box 2249, Benton, AR  72018    You will love them!

 

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: