DEODORANTS

30 08 2011

Speaking of the past – again – did you know there were almost no deodorants until the early 1950’s?  I was a teenager and never had used a deodorant and never needed to.  For some reason, people did not usually smell bad.  Unless they had been working and sweating all day and then they would need to ‘wash up’ in order to smell better before dinner.  But that was usually a man who had worked outdoors doing manual labor all day long.

Anyway, the Lifebuoy was the only deodorant soap on the market that I can remember and Bob Burns was a radio personality who had a funny variety type show on every week.  He fashioned himself as a hillbilly from the backwoods of Arkansas and his sponsor was Lifebuoy.  They had a song on the show that advertised that if you had B.O. (body odor), then you needed to use their soap.  And people who had that B.O. did use their soap and it usually took care of the problem.

Now, I am wondering why people stink so much these days.  And why everyone needs to use the deodorant all the time.  As I said, that was really unheard of before the early 1950’s.  I have been thinking about this all day and it seems to me that people ingest a lot more salt now than they did back then.   We had very little processed foods and almost no ‘eat out’ foods.  So wonder if that could make a difference in our B.O. problem.

I, for one, always ate a lot of sugar so that didn’t seem to present a problem.  But I am wondering about the amount of salt.  Oh well, I will never know the answer to that one, but I can wonder anyway.

Arrid was the first popular deodorant to come onto the market that I remember and they did lots of advertising of their product.   Everyone had Arrid after that and it did a good job.

Well, just thought you might enjoy knowing all that.   Will have something else of supreme importance tomorrow.  Like maybe shampoo or toothpaste.  Hot Dog!





THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS

29 08 2011

HI:  Was just  thinking about those good old days today.  You know, the ones you always hear about that were so wonderful and we should all go back to them.  Bull!!  Things are so much better now.  Or at least they were before you know who came along and started messing with everything.  But that is another story for another day.  And believe me, I will write those when I am ready.

Anyway, when I was a younger person, there was no air conditioning at all.  And on those 100 plus days, it was pretty hot.  But as kids we didn’t know any better anyway so we were perfectly happy with our lives.  We played all over the neighborhood, running as fast and hard as we could.  We skated on the sidewalks and rode our bikes and sat on the porch, swinging with our friends while we visited.  It was a very nice life.  We sweated a lot, but I don’t remember anyone ever having any problems with heat prostration or having to drink water all the time.  When we got thirsty, we just ran into the kitchen, grabbed a drink of water and ran out again.  We drank out of the same glass all the time because there were no dishwashers except us.

We had oscillating fans that kept us cool when we were really hot.  But they didn’t do a lot of good.  I can still see my mother ironing in the front bedroom with an oscillating fan blowing on her legs.  The fan couldn’t blow higher than that because then it would dry out the sprinkled clothes.  The sweat would run down her legs because ironing was such a hot job on a hot day.  But I don’t remember her ever complaining about it.  She listened to the radio while she ironed and that seemed to make her happy.  That was just life in those good old days.

When attic fans came on the market, we were fortunate that our attic could accommodate such a big monster as that.  It took every relative we had to get that fan up in the attic and wired properly.  And it took  a full day for this to happen.  Meanwhile, mother cooked a big pot of spaghetti sauce and all the fixins to go with it.  We had a real feast that day – eating in the big dining room instead of the kitchen – and then the men went back to work while the women and children cleaned up the dishes.

It was a fun day and we all enjoyed it a lot.  But the best part was that night when we opened the windows about a foot, just enough to let that air blow on us while we slept.  It was wonderful.  And I remember it as still being wonderful.  The whole day was lots of fun for us kids.  And just the thought of that blast of cool air coming in that window and blowing the curtains is enough to make me sleep really good even to this day.

Guess those good old days weren’t so bad after all.  Maybe they really were the good old days.  Will write about some more of those.





THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS

29 08 2011

HI:  Was just  thinking about those good old days today.  You know, the ones you always hear about that were so wonderful and we should all go back to them.  Bull!!  Things are so much better now.  Or at least they were before you know who came along and started messing with everything.  But that is another story for another day.  And believe me, I will write those when I am ready.

Anyway, when I was a younger person, there was no air conditioning at all.  And on those 100 plus days, it was pretty hot.  But as kids we didn’t know any better anyway so we were perfectly happy with our lives.  We played all over the neighborhood, running as fast and hard as we could.  We skated on the sidewalks and rode our bikes and sat on the porch, swinging with our friends while we visited.  It was a very nice life.  We sweated a lot, but I don’t remember anyone ever having any problems with heat prostration or having to drink water all the time.  When we got thirsty, we just ran into the kitchen, grabbed a drink of water and ran out again.  We drank out of the same glass all the time because there were no dishwashers except us.

We had oscillating fans that kept us cool when we were really hot.  But they didn’t do a lot of good.  I can still see my mother ironing in the front bedroom with an oscillating fan blowing on her legs.  The fan couldn’t blow higher than that because then it would dry out the sprinkled clothes.  The sweat would run down her legs because ironing was such a hot job on a hot day.  But I don’t remember her ever complaining about it.  She listened to the radio while she ironed and that seemed to make her happy.  That was just life in those good old days.

When attic fans came on the market, we were fortunate that our attic could accommodate such a big monster as that.  It took every relative we had to get that fan up in the attic and wired properly.  And it took  a full day for this to happen.  Meanwhile, mother cooked a big pot of spaghetti sauce and all the fixins to go with it.  We had a real feast that day – eating in the big dining room instead of the kitchen – and then the men went back to work while the women and children cleaned up the dishes.

It was a fun day and we all enjoyed it a lot.  But the best part was that night when we opened the windows about a foot, just enough to let that air blow on us while we slept.  It was wonderful.  And I remember it as still being wonderful.  The whole day was lots of fun for us kids.  And just the thought of that blast of cool air coming in that window and blowing the curtains is enough to make me sleep really good even to this day.

Guess those good old days weren’t so bad after all.  Maybe they really were the good old days.  Will write about some more of those.





THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS

21 08 2011

I was just talking to one of my daughters  about how people used to live a long time ago.  Well, I was there then, so I know how they lived.  And sometimes it wasn’t pleasant at all.  Those good old days really weren’t so wonderful.  Only in the imagination or wishful thinking.  We had started out talking about the kids beginning a new school year and I remember how difficult that could be.

For instance, there were no pants for girls or women.  Everyone had to dress up wherever they went.  The girls and boys wear shorts now.  They also wear t-shirts and sneakers or sandals.  I’m sure they are a whole lot more comfortable than we were.  Back in the good old days, the boys wore dress pants and oxford shoes and a shirt that buttoned up.  We girls always wore a skirt and oxford shoes and usually a starched stiff blouse that we will try not to get too dirty all day long.  But then of course we could never  even have imagined the way people dress these days.

Also, clothes washing was such a chore that clothing was worn more than once if at all possible.  And cleaning was almost never.  It took my mother the first half of a day to wash and in the second half of that day  she brought the clothes in from the line to fold and get ready to iron all day the next day.

People used their washcloth and towel for several days, hanging it in a particular place so everyone knew whose washcloth and towel it was for the week.  And we all bathed in the same bathtub.  Of course my mother made sure it was scrubbed clean after each bather, but that in itself was a big chore.  There were 6 of us in the household.  And I’m sure in looking back that not everyone bathed every day.  Showers were not even heard of.

My father went to the service and was stationed in the Philippines.  He learned to shower there.  The men had hooked a hose over some  wire and directed the water into a shack built for that purpose.  So when he returned home, he rigged up a shower for himself using a garden hose in our basement and that was how he bathed every day for years.  There were none of these nice showers we enjoy today.

You can read more about those good old days in my first book entitled #2503.  Probably not a good title for a book, but that was my address when I was growing up.  I have since written a total of 6 books and love doing that.  Look my books up at booksbybet.com You might want to order some of them.  Thanks, Bet





JUST THOUGHTS

19 08 2011

I had an infection come up on my leg this past week.  Didn’t amount to much.  I just ran into the dishwasher door and it took the top layer of skin off.  After a couple of days, I noticed it was becoming infected so I made an appointment with the doctor.  He prescribed a sulfa antibiotic which is really the only kind I can take.  I think most other people take something else, but not me.  Always have to be different.

I took an antibiotic several years ago for an infection on my arm caused by being stupid and pulling up some poison ivy plants.  That antibiotic really ruined my stomach and it has never been the same since.  Cannot eat fruit at all and have problems with a lot of other foods.  But the poison ivy rash got cured and that is the point, you know.

Anyway, I’m getting off the road here.  I got to thinking about the sulfa drugs and what a wonder they have been.  Most people just take them for granted and think they were always there.  But they weren’t.  Towards the end of World War II, the sulfa drugs were first used to treat men while they were still on the battlefield.  In fact servicemen were given a pouch containing sulfa drugs so they could treat themselves until help could reach them.  The sulfa drug was an absolute miracle, accounting for the saving of many men.  The drug was just sprinkled on their wounds and this kept any infection from getting into the wound which helped many lives to be saved.  This was called a miracle drug in its day – and it definitely was.

Then I read a book and cannot remember the name of it, but it was written by a lady who had leprosy.  She was shuttled off from her home in the United States  at night and ended up on the island where all leprosy people went to die.   Then she told of how awful the people looked and how scared she was and what it was like to know that she could never, ever again leave this island.  She met a fellow patient there and eventually they were married.  But this  would be her life forever, no children, no other family members ever.

And then the sulfa drugs came along.  They were found to stop the progression of leprosy and she told what a wonderful miracle that was.  No longer was she considered to be contagious.   No longer did she have to be an outcast.  She and her husband were able to leave the island and resume a normal life.  All because of the sulfa drugs.

I was just thinking about all that and how fortunate we are in our lives to have such wonderful miracle drugs.  And all the preventive care that is available these days.  There are a number of drugs now that are used to treat leprosy.  No one has to be shuttled from their home in the middle of the night anymore.  No one has to be isolated on an island in the Pacific.  And no one has to endure the horror of having leprosy.  What a wonderful world we have.   How fortunate we are.

God takes really good care of all of us.  Thank you, Dear God.





SEX EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

17 08 2011

I noticed in the news reports today that someone has brought up sex education in the schools once again.  Why!  It all seems so redundant.  In the first place, why do these young children need to be taught any of that anyway.  And particularly why in the schools.

The schools are not teaching history anymore.   No one seems to know anything at all about this country or how we got where we are today or any of the wars or founding fathers or our flag or anything relevant to caring for this country.  So why in the world are they teaching sex education anyway.  Why sex education.  Teach history!!!

And the math is a constant disaster.  No one seems to know how to balance their checkbook or tell themselves no when they see a pretty shiny thing that they don’t need at the store.  And it seems to be ok to eat out all the time when it costs way more than it does to prepare your own food.  Why sex education. Teach them some math!

And English.  Half the country cannot talk in a normal way.  They don’t know what makes up a sentence.  And they sure don’t know how to write one.  Or what a paragraph is or how to write that either.  But someone somewhere thought it was a good idea to teach sex education in the schools.  Ridiculous!  Unnecessary!  All it does is wake up that desire that never was meant to be brought up at their ages anyway.

I had several children.  When the subject of teaching sex education came up at our school, we parents were called to a meeting.  We were told our children would be taught right.  There would be a doctor there and several nurses. So one child came home and running through the house after school called out to me – we had sex education today.  I answered back, what did you learn.  And the child answered me and said, don’t hold hands with the boys.  And that was that.   So much for that grand, great, unnecessary sex education!

And then another child came in and said he had sex education that day.  He was getting a snack from the refrigerator at the time and said, when you mix an x and a y, you get a baby.  And that was that.

Some sex education!  Some unnecessary intrusion into my children’s lives.  Why!!!!   Teach reading, writing,  arithmetic, science, history.  All subjects that should be taught.   Add a small amount of sports and cheerleading and leave my children alone!  Teach them sex education at home if you must.  But leave it out of the school system! In this world of today, we definitely don’t need that!





SUCH SORROW

16 08 2011

I once knew this wonderful family.  The lady was beautiful, the man so handsome.   No apparent problems.  When they married, it was with a huge, beautiful wedding in the biggest church in town, complete with all the bridesmaids and flowers and groomsmen and huge reception afterwards.  Everything was wonderful!

They started out their life together.  He had a good job, she was a housewife and soon had a new baby on the way.  I remember being in their apartment one time and they didn’t seem to be too happy that day.  It was miserably hot and only a fan for cooling.  So I could understand why no one would be smiling just a whole lot.  They soon bought a home and life seemed wonderful once again.  After the first child came another and another and soon another one.  All boys.  She always wanted a girl, so eventually they adopted one.  Life was too good to be true.

Over the years, the father developed quite an alcohol problem.  And some of that was passed down to the boys as they grew up.  Trouble brewing.  The father continued to be a problem for many years.  The mother opted to stay in her bedroom almost all the time.  They lost touch with most of the world.  And the boys deteriorated.  One went to AA.  He got better and eventually had a better life.  Never did know just a lot about the boys as they grew up except what I heard from other people or read in the papers.

Then the youngest son deteriorated into being a really bad alcoholic.  He tried to work but could not.  Never had a family or anything to hang on to.  He finally killed himself at a very young age.  The father developed cancer and died in a hospital.  The mother didn’t live much longer herself.

Then today, I read where one of the boys was killed in a motorcycle accident.  He was 55.  And I am so sorry for so much sorrow.

Great beginnings.  Life just demanded too much day after day.  What a shame.  What a great sorrow for everyone.  What do you do.  How do you avoid such deep and lasting sorrow.  Just cluster together and help each other, that’s how.  Don’t write anyone off.  Everyone can be helped through love and understanding and  a closeness that only a family can bring to each other.  Stay close to your spouse and to your children.  Let them know you care.  Tell them often how much they all mean to you and mean it when you say it.

I contact or have contact with each of my children almost every day.  If I don’t hear from each of them every few days, I am on that phone or texting or emailing or doing something just to make sure they are alright.  I always let them know I care for them and for each member of their families.  I am there if they need me and they are there for me if I need them.  That is the way it is done.  Keep the doors open.  Keep the conversation flowing.  Love them.  Help them.  And maybe then there won’t be that uncalled for deep sorrow that this particular family endured day after day for many years.  It doesn’t matter what caused all the sorrow or how many arguments there were or what anyone said or did.  The point is to stay close as a family.  You know, that closeknit feeling that only a family can share together.  Who else do you know that knows all there is to know about you.  Who else was there when you were 4 or 10 or 20.  Always remember that.

Tell your family you love them.  If there are problems, work them out together or just learn to live with them.  Whatever happens, you are family.  Help each other!